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“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl” by Robert Bateman - $500

“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 1 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 2 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 3 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 4 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 5 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 6 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 7 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 8 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 9 thumbnail“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”  by Robert Bateman 10 thumbnail
condition: new
“Ghost of the North - Great Gray Owl”
by Robert Bateman (Canadian, b.1930)
(sold out edition)

Beautiful double matted, framed, signed, numbered (#339/950), sold out edition, lithograph print

Print measures 27” wide x 20” tall
Frame measures 34” wide x 28” tall

"The great gray owl is truly a ghost of the north. It is fleeting and silent. It seems to be the largest of the owls, but it is mostly feathers and weighs much less than the great horned owl. Its wing feathers have downy edges like other owls, making its flight totally silent. The colors are subdued, and the patterns provide excellent camouflage.
I wanted to portray this ghostliness in the painting. This is why I gave everything a
flat and hazy look. the colors are restrained, and the owl blends perfectly with the tree. The tree is an aspen, one of the typical species of the owl's habitat
in the boreal forest.
I made the entire painting an allegory for the face of the owl. The most spectacular
thing about the great gray owl is his face. It consists of two huge saucer-shaped
disks with concentric and radiating patterns centered on the eye. He also has a white " beard. " I treated the tree trunk as the beak axis and made the twigs
and branches radiate like the owl's facial feathers. The real owl's head is located
where the eye would be if the tree represents the allegorical owl's head. I have even used the idea of the beard for some light areas of the background." -
Robert Bateman

“Born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1930, Robert Bateman was a keen artist and naturalist from his early days. Bateman painted wildlife and wilderness in a representational style until his teens when he began to interpret nature using a variety of contemporary styles including post-impressionism and abstract expressionism. In the early 60s, Bateman rediscovered realism and began to develop the style that would make him one of the foremost artists depicting the world of nature. In the 70s and early 80s, Bateman's work began to receive critical acclaim and to attract an enormous following.

Since his first one-man show in 1967, Bateman has had numerous sell-out exhibitions in Canada, the United States and Great Britain. His work is in many public and private collections, including several art museums. He was commissioned by the Governor General of Canada to do a painting as the wedding gift for HRH The Prince Charles from the people of Canada. His work is also included in the collections HRH The Prince Philip, the late Princess Grace of Monaco and Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands. Bateman has had many one-man museum shows throughout North America, including an exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.; most of these shows have drawn record-breaking crowds. His honours, awards and honorary doctorates are numerous, he was made Officer of the Order of Canada, our country's highest civilian award. He has also been the subject of three films. Two books of his art, "The Art of Robert Bateman" and "The World of Robert Bateman", have made publishing history; they have sold more that half a million copies.”

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