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“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad - $600

“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 1 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 2 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 3 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 4 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 5 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 6 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 7 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 8 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 9 thumbnail“Susitna Sunset” Awesome landscape print by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad 10 thumbnail
“Susitna Sunset”
by Alaskan artist Don Kolstad
(American, b.1952)

An awesome landscape print
capturing the beauty of fireweed and
Mt Susitna at sunset

A captivating scene of natures
beauty of fireweed and a view of
Mount Susitna, from a vantage point across Cook Inlet from Anchorage, Alaska evoking a sense of wonder and tranquility as the sun sinks below the horizon

Beautifully double matted
with a gold metallic frame,
measuring 25.5” tall x 35.5” wide,
this artwork is a remarkable statement piece, perfect for elevating the aesthetics of any living space or office environment.

Well taken care of, in great condition,
waiting to adorn your wall!

https://donkolstadart.com/about

Mount Susitna or “Sleeping Lady”

You can see Sleeping Lady if you look west from Anchorage across the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet. Yes, the mountain resembles a lady sleeping on her side.

Mount Susitna has an elevation of 4,396 feet.

In the Dena’ina language it’s Dghelishia, meaning “Little Mountain” or “Sandy River” referring to Cook Inlet

The Dena’ina name for Cook Inlet is Tikahtnu, meaning “Big Water River”, “Ocean River” or Nuti, meaning “saltwater”

The Dena’ina are the only Northern Athabascan group to live on saltwater (Cook Inlet). The meaning of the word Dena’ina has two parts. Dena, meaning “person” and ina, meaning “people”.

The Legend of the Sleeping Lady

Many millennia ago, a clan of gentle giants inhabited the Great Land, now known as Alaska.

Among the giant people was a beautiful young lady and a handsome young man who fell deeply in love with each other. Their unbound devotion was so joyous that all the villagers admired them and preparations for marriage were underway.

On the day before the wedding a messenger brought dreadful news that a fierce war-like people from the north were invading the country and destroying everything in their path. The village gathered in council to decide what to do. Some suggested going north to attack. The young love-filled man proposed taking gifts to the enemies instead of weapons, showing their interest was in peace and not bloodshed. By morning the brave volunteers were ready to leave.

The young lady had tears of sadness when her lover came to say goodbye. He gazed softly into her eyes and whispered, “I shall return soon with news of peace. Meet me by the slender body of water with two arms.” With one gentle kiss he turned and joined the departing men. The young woman hurried to the pool of water, known today as the Knik Arm, and began the wait, confident that she would soon be back in her mate's arms. For many days and nights she busied herself while waiting until finally she grew very weary and laid down to rest. She fell into a deep sleep.

While she slept, tragic news reached the village that their young men's pleas for peace had been in vain and a terrible battle had broken out. Most of the giant men were killed or captured. When the village women approached the young lady with the tragic news, they could not bare to disturb her from her peaceful sleep, and left her as she was.

To this day, the sleeping lady lies there dreaming of the moment her beloved will return to her side and peace once again rules the land.

The first printing of the legend was written by Nancy Lesh and was published in 1962. Ann Dixon later published the legend in a picture book in 1994.

Dena’ina Elder, Peter Kalifornsky, continued the story in “A Dena’ina Legacy”.

In his story of the mountain people and a giant who became Susitna mountain (Sleeping Lady). Her relatives followed her and became Mount Redoubt, Mount Iliamna and the Chigmit mountain range. Another wandered inland and became Denali. Ok

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